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Social Studies

Social Studies

 

World History (202):  1 credit – Grade 9 – Weight 1.0

The World History course provides students with a comprehensive and intensive study of the major events and themes throughout world history.  Students will begin with an overview of the ancient civilizations, the earliest civilizations worldwide, and continue to examine major developments and themes in all regions of the world. This course culminates in a study of change, continuity and globalization of the 21st century.  The study of World History is a discipline that involves interaction between the past and the present.  Studying world history can help us understand who we are today, by examining the responses, adaptations, and decisions people made in response to the conditions around them.  The discipline of world history involves more than simply memorizing facts–it requires both analysis and investigation as we seek to understand why our predecessors made the decisions they did.  Our goal is to communicate this perspective to our students to make the important connection between the past and the present to enhance our future understanding of the world.  

 

Honors World History (202H):  1 credit – Grade 9 – Weight 1.1

The World History course provides students with a comprehensive and intensive study of the major events and themes throughout world history.  Students will begin with an overview of the ancient civilizations, the earliest civilizations worldwide, and continue to examine major developments and themes in all regions of the world. This course culminates in a study of change, continuity and globalization of the 21st century.  The study of World History is a discipline that involves interaction between the past and the present.  Studying world history can help us understand who we are today, by examining the responses, adaptations, and decisions people made in response to the conditions around them.  The discipline of world history involves more than simply memorizing facts–it requires both analysis and investigation as we seek to understand why our predecessors made the decisions they did.  Our goal is to communicate this perspective to our students to make the important connection between the past and the present to enhance our future understanding of the world.  

 

This honors level course will include a more intense and in–depth study of our world history.  Students will be expected to complete more independent and collaborative projects/work both in and out of class, to complete in an out of class readings (both fiction and non–fiction), to participate in discussion forums, and to perform at the honors level at all times.  Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation.

 

U.S. History (200):  1 credit – Grade 10 – Weight 1.0

United States (U.S.) History is a study of our nation’s past starting in the mid–19th and continuing through the early 21st century. Major themes include Industrialization, Progressivism, World War, Poverty, Civil Rights victories, Politics, and Current Events.  The study of U.S. History is an evolving process in which we connect the past to our present circumstances. Various teaching strategies combined with 21st century thinking and technological skills help students analyze our past to make predictions about our future.

 

Honors U.S. History (200H):  1 credit – Grade 10 – Weight 1.1

United States (U.S.) History is a study of our nation’s past starting in the mid–19th and continuing through the early 21st century. Major themes include Industrialization, Progressivism, World War, Poverty, Civil Rights victories, Politics, and Current Events.  The study of U.S. History is an evolving process in which we connect the past to our present circumstances. Various teaching strategies combined with 21st century thinking and technological skills help students analyze our past to make predictions about our future.   This honors level course will include a more intense and in–depth study of our history.  Students will be expected to complete more independent and collaborative projects/work both in and out of class, to complete in an out of class readings (both fiction and non–fiction), to participate in discussion forums, and to perform at the honors level at all times.  Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation.

 

Civics & Government (203):  1 credit – Grade 11 – Weight 1.0

Civics and Government will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States and worldwide. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and the analysis of specific case studies. Emphasis will be placed on the federal system and national government, the legislative process, the executive function, the role of the judiciary, and the rights and responsibilities of the citizenry in a free society. 

The major purpose of this course is to help students gain and display an understanding of American politics and the processes of government that help shape our public policies.  Students will begin to develop a more sophisticated and insightful understanding of citizenship, majority rule democracy, federalism, civil liberties, and other distinguishing characteristics of the American political system.

 

Honors Civics & Government (203H):  1 credit – Grade 11 – Weight 1.1

Civics and Government will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States and worldwide. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and the analysis of specific case studies. Emphasis will be placed on the federal system and national government, the legislative process, the executive function, the role of the judiciary, and the rights and responsibilities of the citizenry in a free society. 

The major purpose of this course is to help students gain and display an understanding of American politics and the processes of government that help shape our public policies.  Students will begin to develop a more sophisticated and insightful understanding of citizenship, majority rule democracy, federalism, civil liberties, and other distinguishing characteristics of the American political system.

This honors level course will include a more intense and in–depth study of our history.  Students will be expected to complete more independent and collaborative projects/work both in and out of class, to complete in an out of class readings (both fiction and non–fiction), to participate in discussion forums, and to perform at the honors level at all times.  Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation.

 

AP US Government & Politics (203AP):  1 credit – Grade 11, 12 – Weight 1.2 – Offered 2022/23

AP Civics and Government presents the principles of the American representative form of government.  The intent of instruction is to instill the acts and policies of the framers of the Declaration of Independence and of the Constitution that it is a citizen’s duty and responsibility to exercise their voting privilege and to understand the American form of government as in comparison to other forms of government. This course is a college level course. College credit may be obtained for a student’s freshman level Civics and/or Government course upon completion and passage of the AP Civics and Government Exam. This course is extremely independent in nature. It follows a college level text and the student must be prepared to work independently on content not covered in class, content covered in class and content created and studied outside of class. Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation.

 

AP U.S. History (200AP):  1 credit – Grade 12 – Weight 1.2 – Offered 2022/23

The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full–year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. This course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions based on an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation.

 

Social Studies Electives

 

Cultural Diversity (909):  ½ credit – Grade 10, 11, 12 – Weight 1.0 – Offered Every Year

This course focuses on the issues, challenges, and opportunities presented by America’s growing diverse population.  The goal of the class is to encourage students to think in more informed ways through increased understanding, appreciation, and discuss about kinds of difference – racial, ethnic, age, religious, social class, gender, physical ability, and sexual preference/orientation– and for students to become more sophisticated in examining the way race and culture are used as terms in everyday speech.  Students will gain insight as to their own attitudes and develop a greater awareness and curiosity about the many cultural worlds in the U.S.  As part of the course, students will be required to participate in a community service activity.  Students will be required to participate in role–playing activities, research information, and be open–minded.

 

Economics (906):  ½ credit – Grade 11, 12 – Weight 1.0 – Offered 2022/23

This course will give the students a greater understanding of economics ranging from the viewpoint of the individual consumer or small business owner to the global economy. The course will study the law of supply and demand, forms of business, labor unions, government finances and influence on the economy, money and prices, inflation and deflation cycles, as well as personal economic decision–making concepts like credit and interest rates. The course relates history and politics to the study of economics.

 

Holocaust & Genocide Studies (903):  ½ credit – Grade 10, 11, 12 – Weight 1.0 – Offered 2022/23

This course is designed to be an in–depth study of the complex factors contributing to the Holocaust, and the events of 1933–1945. The goal of this course is to explore, analyze and evaluate the impact of the genocide on post–war Europe and generations to come.  We will look at the Holocaust both chronologically and thematically. Students will understand the nature of human prejudices, study the rise of Nazi Germany, analyze the complexity of choice and individual responsibility, and examine relevance to contemporary society. Major topics include anti–Semitism, Nazi ideology, ghettos, the “Final Solution”, and resistance

 

Psychology and Pop Culture (semester) (905):  ½ credit – Grade 11, 12 – Weight 1.0 – Offered Every Year

Does a zombie have a functioning brain?

How does Batman use fear to save Gotham city?

Is Darth Vader really the bad guy in Star Wars?

These questions AND MORE are answered in this semester long course, Psychology and Pop Culture. Throughout this course we will take a look at various psychological perspectives, science, and theories to explain how we as humans navigate this world of never ending social influence. We will examine how psychology is used to affect pop culture as well as pop culture’s influence on our own psyche. What does it all mean?

We will explore how these concepts around us influence our culture and, to a greater extent, the world around us, especially in our entertainment. Students at the end of this course will conduct an experiment of their own on the topic and discuss its implications in detail. So jump on your dragon, open your mind and imagination, and prepare to view the world under the lens of abnormal and social psychology!


IB Psychology (905IB):  1 credit – Grade 11, 12 – Weight 1.2 – Offered Every Year

At the core of the IB psychology course is an introduction to three different approaches to understanding behavior: the biological, cognitive and sociocultural approaches. Students study and critically evaluate the knowledge, concepts, theories and research that have developed the understanding in these fields.

IB psychology promotes an understanding of the various approaches to research and how they are used to critically reflect on the evidence as well as assist in the design, implementation, analysis and evaluation of the students’ own investigations. Surrounding the approaches and the options are the overarching themes of research and ethics. A consideration of both is paramount to the nature of the subject. This allows students to appreciate the diversity as well as the commonality between their own behavior and that of others.

Goals Include:

  • Develop an awareness of how psychological research can be applied to address real-world problems and promote positive change
  • Understand the importance of ethical practice in psychological research in general and observe ethical practice in their own inquiries
  • Ensure that ethical practices are upheld in all psychological inquiry and discussion
  • Develop an understanding of the biological, cognitive and sociocultural factors affecting mental processes and behavior
  • Discuss areas of applied psychology: abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, health psychology, and the psychology of relationships.

**** All students in this course will be prepared and eligible to take the IB Psychology assessment AND the AP Psychology assessment for potential college credit!****

 

Military History (923):  ½ credit – Grade 10, 11, 12 – Weight 1.0 – Offered 2022/23

Students will become better critical thinkers, problem solvers, decision–makers, and team players by analyzing the motivations for and the impact of warfare on society. The course will cover the history of war starting with the first documented conflict (Peloponnesian War) and then shift focus to U.S. Military encounters. Students will be expected to use 21st Century skills to complete the largely student–centered curriculum that was created to give learners from all backgrounds an opportunity for interest and engagement. Class members will have the ability to choose a “lens” through which to look at each time period we cover in class. The lenses include but are not limited to Patriotism/Nationalism, Inhumanity, Power, Justice, Morality, Identity, Place/Homeland, and Gender. They will use these “lenses” to study the following aspects of war: Politics, Leaders, Weaponry/Technology, Resources, Art/Poetry, Geography, Strategy/Tactics, and Culture. The course is designed to engage students and develop skills necessary to find success in our modern world.

 

Modern U.S. (904):  ½ credit – Grade 10, 11, 12 – Weight 1.0 – Offered 2022/23

Contemporary U.S. History and Popular Culture provides students with the opportunity to analyze modern 20th and 21st century history and the diversity of American culture.  Within this course, students will explore how popular culture has influenced Americans economically, politically, socially and historically.  The goal of the class is to gain an appreciation for American culture and history by examining the values and experiences of Americans in the 1980’s through early 2000’s.  To accomplish this goal, students will evaluate the cultural and social significance of popular culture elements that influenced attitudes and behaviors of American society as a whole.

 

Women in American Society:  ½ credit – Grade 10, 11, 12 – Weight 1.0 – Offered 2022/23

In a variety of topics, from women’s roles in society, the history of witchcraft, through today’s roles for women, this course will examines the historical and contemporary issues of gender, drawing from economics, history, psychology, sociology, laws and language. Students will learn how gender shapes humanity and has determined the social, economic, political and cultural organization of human society throughout history. This course will also focus on the development of thinking and writing skills.

 

 

Black History: ½ credit-Grade 10, 11, 12 –Weight 1.0-Offered 2022/23

This course provides a broad historical survey of the African-American experience in the United States, designed to introduce students to the major themes, issues, and debates in African American history from its African origins until today. Some of the specific topics covered include African antecedents, colonial and antebellum slavery, the abolition movement, the free black experience, the Civil War, emancipation, Jim Crow segregation, racial violence, black culture, the modern freedom struggle, popular culture, political movements, and the contemporary experience. Ultimately, students should gain an understanding of how enslaved and free African Americans have and continue to live, work, socialize, and define themselves in American society.